English

Research and Documentation Online

Screenshot of the Research and Documentation Online website

Quick reference for APA, MLA, Chicago, & CSE writing guidelines and sample research papers in each style.  The Research and Documentation Online site provides the same basic information as A Writer’s Reference by Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers. This website was created and is maintained by Bedford St. Martin’s, the same publisher as Hacker’s reference textbook. It provides information on MLA, APA, Chicago, and CSE writing/formatting guidelines. You can find the details of these styles by clicking ‘Documenting Sources’ in the colored banner of each subject.  MLA is under the Humanities, APA is under the Social sciences, Chicago is under History, and CSE is under Sciences.  Each item under ‘Documenting Sources’ parallels exactly what is provided in the printed text, including: in-text citations, list of works cited or references, information notes, manuscript format, and sample research paper. The sample paper is even the same one that is in the printed textbook!

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Virtual Grammar Wiki

Virtual Grammar is a site created by our very own Mary Dewine, English 095 instructor here at TCC.  The site provides links to informational pages, youtube videos, and online exercises for the following grammar topics: fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, commonly confused words, tense shifts, conciseness (eliminating wordiness), simple/compound/complex sentences, and passive voice.

 

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Semicolon Wars on Punctuation Island

Though Mr.Nussbaum’s website was created primarily for kids, there are some fun educational games that can definitely help you practice certain important and difficult content in English, Math, and other subjects.  The Semicolon Wars of Punctuation Island is a really fun game to practice the use of semicolons, periods, comas, and colons. Even as a college student, these are grammar points that need review and practice! So enjoy this game 🙂

 

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Spelling Bee

Games to Learn English’s Spelling Bee game is great for practicing spelling.  The game first lets you select a general vocabulary topic area.  Then it speaks words to you from that vocabulary set and you have to type them using the keyboard on the screen.  It shows you a picture of the word as well for context. If you do not immediately choose the correct letter, the letters on the keyboard will begin to disappear to gradually reveal the correct letter.

 


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WikiHow: How To Spell

The How To Spell wikiHow is a great tool for reviewing the primary rules for English spelling.  It also provides printable handouts of a “Spelling Rules Cheat Sheet” and “Common Mispellings”, which can be helpful to have on hand as needed.  The end of the post gives some tips on how to practice and improve your spelling.  This is a very useful informational post to help with English spelling study!

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Language is a Virus

Cure writer’s block, play with words, and find inspiration for your writing. Language is a Virus provides various fun and helpful tools to play with language to help you create your own writing works!  This is great for creative writing, poetry, or even help with rewording difficult sentences in an essay or project.

 

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Grammar Ninja

Practice recognizing parts of speech in basic to advanced English sentences. Grammar Ninja game tests the player on identifying parts of speech (noun, verb, adverb, article, conjunction, preposition & pronoun) in a sentence. It has beginning, intermediate and advanced challenges.  This is a fun game to practice and learn with.

 

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Good Typing

Learn to type/keyboard. Good Typing provides a free keyboarding course with 30 levels/lessons. You are required to register (for free) in order to save your progress. However, the unique thing about this program is that you can practice typing with out having to correct your mistakes or use the backspace at all. If you type a letter incorrectly, it will just null it out and not progress until you type the letter correctly. Then, it keeps track of the mistakes blindly and will give you your speed and error results after completing that lesson. You can then choose to retake it or move on depending on how your results were. 

 

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Typing Club

 Learn how to type. The Typing Club site provides very well organized typing lessons with goals and great immediate results. You are able to track your progress if you want, but you do not have to. The format is simple and easy to use. It is like a game, so it makes you want to keep trying again until you get 3 stars.

 

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Typing Web Tutor

 Learn typing/keyboarding. Typing Web Tutor provides free interactive typing lessons showing you which finger to use for each letter.  You can save your progress if you create a free account, so you can come back later and start where you left off.  It requires more clicking than some other typing websites, but the visuals are helpful and progress is guided.

 

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How-To-Type.com

Learn typing/keyboarding. How-To-Type provides simple written typing lessons, typing practice, and typing tests.  Just read the instructions and then a practice typing the set of letters.  After completing the short exercise, it will automatically show you your typing accuracy and speed for that particular exercise. The great thing about this site is how easy it is to start learning and practicing. It is well organized and doesn’t require much clicking or changing pages, which is nice.

 

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